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GAZA PARADE & TRIBUTE
December 1942.


  



Parade & March Past of 9th Australian Division & 8th Army Tributes to Fallen after Alamein.

Photo courtesy “Tom Roberts War Diaries” .   



    

TOP

   President Geoff Rawson. 

On Friday the 4th April, our monthly meeting proved to be another success with our speaker John Peake addressing a group of 50 members and visitors about the Crime Museum in London.  This was a fascinating address with photographs and DVD footage detailing some of the more horrific murders and offences in London.  The Museum first established in the late 1800 to educate police officers and is not open to the general public.  John was presented with a certificate of appreciation, a book and one of our new booklets “police history” which, incidentally, is now available to members for just $2.00.

 The raffle raised $100.00.

 My congratulations to the museum volunteers,  especially Kevin Beare and Holger Kruse who have had to work very hard to get the museum back into some sort of order for our first tour of the year on Sunday the 30th March,  when we hosted the CSIRO Double Helix Science club of 75members.  More than 20 volunteers turned up to make it a wonderful day with BBQ, tours of the mounted, vehicle display and museum tour.  A report on Volunteer activities is included on Page 11.

 Brass nameplates have been delivered,  to replace the previous temporary ones,  and will be fitted soon.  Our new curtains have also been delivered and this will provide yet more work for our volunteers.

 On Sunday the 13th Police Anzac Day will be held in the Police Academy at 10.00am.  Members are encouraged to attend this solemn occasion which will focus on MC Louis T Parsons, who was killed in action in World War I.

 On Monday the 28th April Police Foundation Day will be held at the North Terrace Police barracks where the “In line of duty” display from Canberra will be officially opened.  This also marks the 170th anniversary of the foundation of the SA Police Force and should be a great morning with the display available for at least a month, everyone will have the opportunity to visit this highly acclaimed presentation.  

 On Tuesday the 29th April we will have a special day at Thebarton Barracks where the focus will be on the Police Museum for members of parliament and other invited guests and members.  This will be held in the morning and will feature some of our historic vehicles alongside of the latest police vehicles boats etc.  Hopefully this will draw the media to promote the museum and the activities of our society. 

 A list of upcoming events for the months of April & May is provided on Page 12 of this edition.  If you are able to assist with any of the internal tours etc. please do not hesitate to contact us. If the work is shared it certainly lightens the load.

Our next Meeting is on Friday the 2nd May when our Speaker will be Trevor Peart whose subject will be West Terrace Cemetery’s Notable Characters.  I look forward to seeing you there.

                   


Geoff Rawson
.

            President.

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WORLD WAR I.                                                                WORLD WAR II.                  


F.C.  John Blackie   A.I.F.    
25/4/1918 50th Battalion Killed in Action.


M.C.  Archie Badenoch  A.I.F.

28/11/1942  Killed in action in Middle East.

M.C. W.H.Field A.I.F.

 Killed in Action.


F.C. J.H. Beattie A.I.F.

 17/6/1943.  Died as prisoner of war in a Thai Camp.  Japanese would not give cause of death.

F.C. A. Graham A.I.F.

25/8/1915 Cause of death not known.



J.C. G.B. Coad R.A.A.F. 

28/5/1943. Killed in air operations.


F.C. H.Higgs A.I.F.

killed in Action.




J.C. B.J. Davis R.A.A.F.

29/8/1942 Killed in aircraft accident.


M.C.  H.M. Johnston     A.I.F.

 22/2/1916. Cause of death not  known.



J.C. W.M. Hooper R.A.A.F.

26/2/1943  Killed in action.

F.C. S.E. Jones A.I.F.

1/3/1915 Killed in action in France.


M.C.  A.J.B. Humphries

 R.A.A.F.


Killed in action.

F.C.  H. Mellowship

A.I.F.

 31/5/1916  Cause of death not known.



P.C.  J.E. MacLeod   R.A.A.F.

5/12/1944.  Missing in air operations.

F.C.  Francis Michael Nelson    A.I.F.

32nd Battalion Killed in Action 26/6/1918.



F. C.  D. McCulloch  A.I.F.

3/9/1943.   Killed on active service in a Malayan Camp.


M.C. Louis T. Parsons.      A.I.F.

    Killed in action.


V.L. Pope
J.C.  V.L. Pope R.A.A.F.
23/5/1943  Killed in air Operations.


F.C. Charles Gordon
Smitham -  A.I.F.
50th Battery Killed in action Messines Ridge 10/6/1917
.


J.C. John Percy Raffen R.A.A.F.
30/12/43. Killed in action.



F.C. J.P. Thorpe  A.I.F.

Killed in action.




P.C.  M.J. Russell   R.A.A.F.
14/8/1943. Killed in action.







P.C.  C.S. Temby   R.A.A.F.
23/1/1944. Killed in action.








P.C.  L.O. Tugwell   R.A.A.F.
13/8/1944. Failed to return from an air raid over Germany.







F.C.C.  Llewelyn  John Thomas 
Killed 26/7/1969 Serving with Australian Police Unit in Cyprus.




ANZAC MEMORIAL SERVICE.


On Sunday 13th April at 10.30 am there will be a Police Service of Remembrance at the  Police Academy to honour those officers who gave their tomorrows for our today.

 This year M.C. Louis T. Parsons killed in action in World War I  has been chosen

to represent all these brave men.    

 All are invited to attend this, our ceremony of remembrance.


Group Boer War Veterans in SA Police Force. 


Back L>R: T. Rowe, W. Ryan, G.A .Noblet, D. Jennings,    A White   

Middle L>R: A.G. Wellington, A.McBeath,  T. Attiwell.   J Stevens, J. McBeth, F.B. Wilkin, Wylie Nation     

 Front L>R: E. Noblet, J .O'Toole, J. Smart, C. Prosser, D. McArthur, E  Mattfelot, C. Tavener




                 


































A lovely quiet day; sent several parcels home and cleaned up the area as we expect to move soon, perhaps tomorrow.  Every time we move, the whole of the area we have occupied is thoroughly cleaned to the accompaniment of wails from the fatigue parties  ….  “Old Tom” has always insisted on it and has never let up.  It’s a bit like shaving, the worst part about it is making up your mind to do it.  And it is made up, as far as the C.O. is concerned.

(Dave Goodhart writes:  “We did maintenance, checked all equipment, calibrated guns … cleaned up salvage areas allotted … and followed the 8th Army wistfully westwards by wireless; collected our fallen comrades’ graves from outlying parts and cared for them in El Alamein Cemetery  ..” (History 2.7th).


Among the graves:  Michael Brookman & Pat Mahoney.
Later the markers were separated, but the fellows could never be.



Behind Alamein, The German Cemetery.

Usual crop of rumours, two theories are being advanced.  One is that we were only to be used to break up Jerry’s line and then return to Syria and Palestine (they are pessimists); the other is that we will be used again anywhere Rommel tries to renew resistance and that we will certainly follow up as soon as our reinforcements are up to standard  … I have three best going with Hurtle Blight:

(1) that we will not be back in Australia for Christmas 1942; a ₤1 bet to be paid in the currency of whatever country we are in.  (The currency idea is a shrewd move on my part, if I win I get paid in Egyptian or Palestinian cash which is up 25% on Australian!).

(2) That Australian fighting troops will go as far west as Tobruk (only 20 piastres).

(3) That Allied troops are in Tripoli by 31 January 1943 (₤1).

 
Most of us hate the idea of going back to Palestine—guard duties and all the nonsense start again and we hate it. ….Mostly because it is unnecessary and because of the silly ceremonial that accompanies it.

 
At this moment very few hold out any hope of going home before Germany is finished off; most of us think we will take part in the attack on the Continent.  The Infantry is hard at it (training excises) whenever we see them; seems funny that men who have just fought so brilliantly should be back at bayonet exercises and such-like stuff.

 
I take my hat off to our Infantry.  No doubt about it, they have what it takes.  Ours is a life of luxury compared to theirs; we fight and die too, but we just stand and take it,.  There is something splendid in the way they go into it—and get there.

 
Is it possible that Australia will ever forget these men—later on?  The trouble is that no one who has not been in it can realize what these men have been through—and done.


TOP



FROM THE ARCHIVES
125 Years Ago





The following articles come to us from member Ray Killmier, through the files of the Bunyip.

AN EXCITING CHASE:  

The serenity which usually prevails in Salisbury on Christmas Day, was this year broken by a report, to the effect a man named Griffiths a farmer in the neighbourhood, had become insane and was running about in a perfectly nude state.

He was seen by two young men at a spot about two miles south of the township on the bank of a creek.
The matter was reported to the police in the township, who, with several other residents, proceeded on horseback to capture the fugitive, and after a very exciting chase of about nine miles, this was effected in the vicinity of the Dry Creek Stockade.

In his mad career, the poor fellow had crossed stubble and fallow fields, and was consequently in a pitiable condition when caught.

The explanation he tendered was, that the world was coming to and end, and he was proceeding to Adelaide to apprise Dr.Patterson of the fact, and he had divested himself of his clothing in order to facilitate his progress.

HORRIBLE MURDER AT HAMLEY BRIDGE:  

On Sunday morning last, the inhabitants of Hamley Bridge were thrown into a state of great excitement by the circulation of a report of a man had been murdered.  The report upon enquiry was found to be indeed too true.

It appears a native of Denmark named Christian Renderup, a laborer working in the scrub, had been in the habit of frequenting the house of Mr. and Mrs. MacGree, about half a mile north of the township, for the purpose of carousing.  It is supposed one of these drunken sprees were held.

The next that was known of him was the finding of his dead body about five yards distance from the front door of MacGree’s house.

It appears early on Sunday morning cries were heard by the neighbours in the voice of the deceased praying MacGree to spare his life and Mrs. MacGree calling out, “Bring me an axe to chop him up.

A jury convicted Mr. and Mrs. MacGree for willful murder, and their daughter Margaret was found guilty of being an accessory.


80 Years Ago.


CURIOUS CLIPPINGS
By Allan Peters
THE MAIL
June 23rd, 1928


OUTBACK POLICEMAN:

One of the most interesting personalities met during Bond’s Tourist Tour to Central Australia last year was Constable Cameron, at Alice Well.  Constable Cameron, formerly of Adelaide, transferred to the Northern Territory Police in 1911.  He controls the largest police territory in Australia.  It takes him three months to patrol his area from east to west.
Constable Cameron has during his sixteen years experience in Central Australia captured thirteen murderers.  His most notable exploits and one that brought him fame throughout Australia, was when he “went bush”, stripped and painted himself, and living the life of a native, tracked and captured a murderer.
Mr. Bond will conduct a similar tour this year, and also one to Darwin.  Both tours are scheduled to leave Adelaide on July 3rd.  Studebaker cars will be used and every comfort and convenience will be provided for passengers.  A chef will accompany the party and blanked-lined sleeping bas will be provided.  A wireless receiving set will be carried, and an aeroplane will accompany as members of the party.  Early booking is essential.  Particulars regarding tours may be obtained from Tourist Booking Company, Theatre Royal Buildings, Hindley Street, Adelaide.








TOP

Friday 2nd May, 2008 at 8.00 pm.

SPEAKER:   Trevor Peart

 SUBJECT:  West Terrace Cemetery’s Notable Characters.



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Many and varied are the stories that are told of the old graves that lie in all sorts of places across our countryside. In some instances the identity of the person there is never known. At Moorlands, right beside the road, is a small fenced-off area, left undisturbed by the road makers when they were working on the highway. Local tradition gives many different stories as to who lies beneath. Apparently nobody knows for sure.

In our present story the reverse is the case.     William Beecroft, a deserter from the army, drowned in   trying to swim his horse across the Murray at Morphett’s crossing [present day Wellington], but the likelihood of anyone knowing the site of his grave is very remote.
This story really begins in November 1839, a little more than a year after the formation of our Police Force, when the peaceful scene of Hindmarsh Square was rudely shattered. The old “Register” reported the event thus:

“In broad daylight five people [including a woman] accosted Mr. David Campbell as he quietly went about his business. They called his attention to a tree lying on the ground, and as he turned to look at it they knocked him down. Brown placed his hand upon Campbell’s stomach and the woman held him by the hair, Collins took from his breeches pocket £25 in notes and some odd shillings and the other person held him by the throat and mouth. He struggled and called out murder and made a snatch at the notes taken out of his pockets, and there remained in his hand a half of a £1 note. The man who had held him by the throat he beat severely about the face - the other two ran away. The person whom he believed to be Wilson came up and rescued this man. About an hour after this occurred he saw Collins and Brown coming out of the “Bricklayers’ Arms.” He seized them and with the assistance of the police they were accompanied to the station house and were searched and money, among which, was the torn half of the £1 note, was discovered. Wilson was afterwards taken at the Bricklayers’ Arms.”

In due course Jeremiah Collins, William Brown, John  Wilson, Edward Green and Sarah Ann Green were all charged with highway robbery. Our particular story centres around William Brown [also known as McDonald] who was rewarded for his part in the  attack by being transported to New South Wales, and to Sydney he went on the “Mary Ridgeway” in 1840 - for life!

Nearly four years later the scene of our story shifts to Morphett’s Crossing on the River Murray. Here a police outpost had been set up on the eastern bank as early as 1840. One day, in April, 1843 the local natives, devoted followers of Corporal George Mason, [who was in charge of the post] came to him with news that a body of men and horses was in the neighbourhood and travelling to the Crossing. Not long before this, five men had escaped from the Melbourne Gaol and taken to the bush, heading west and stealing horses as they went, and the “Hue and Cry” from the eastern colonies gave details of these escapees. Mason, on receiving the news that came in on the aboriginal grapevine, was on the lookout for the little band of bushrangers.
He hadn’t long to wait. That evening a stranger presented himself at the police post, his hand badly injured by the explosion of a gunpowder flask. Close on his trail came two troopers of the Victorian Police Force in hot pursuit of the fugitives. They promptly identified the caller as William Brown, who had left Adelaide under compulsion a few years earlier, and who had been among those who broke gaol in Melbourne. Brown was promptly escorted by the Portland Bay troopers to the      Adelaide Gaol, and left there pending a second    deportation trip.

Meantime, back at the Crossing place next day, a mare was brought in and another found drowned with saddle and bridle on. Mason had the job of finding the rider. The following letter, April 30, 1843, from, the Police Station, at Wellington, tells the story:-
“Sir - I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of the Commissioner of Police, that I have caused the body of the man found in the Murray River to be interred.

In obedience to instructions received I have examined the body to ascertain if there was any marks on any part, but in consequence of its being very much decomposed, and the skin having been quite black, I was unable to distinguish if there were any marks or not. I am of the opinion that the body answers to the description of the deserter Beecroft from the 80th Regiment, which I received in the Hue and Cry.’

The following is the description of the body taken by me previous to interment. Height about 5’ 6” - light brown hair - light eyebrows - face round, large head, stout make, stout legs, rather large feet, a short neck, very small nose, not large mouth, square shoulders - not broad. The body had been so long in the water that it was impossible to take a correct description of it, the wild dogs having eaten off both hands and part of one arm . . . The legs of the deceased were slightly drawn up as if drowned in the act of sitting a horse...”

An attempt to find a jury proved to be impossible -
“Upon enquiry I find that a jury cannot be  collected in the neighbourhood in which the body now lies - there being no settlers from which the requisite number of men can be obtained within a distance of 30 miles, and the attendance of whom would be attended with considerable expense.”
 The story ends at Wellington. “On top of a hill near the police hut there is a grave; its place was once marked by a mound of sand, though it has since been almost obliterated by time. It is the grave of a bushranger, a lawless, yet a brave man, who escaped and after combating the toils and dangers of the desert and scrub for hundreds of miles was drowned in attempting to swim across the Murray.  Mason found his body and, at the setting of the sun, buried him in the sand. The natives look on the spot with dread and at night avoid it, as they say the white man’s spirit still lingers there,” wrote a visitor to the area some years later.      The Victorian troopers stayed some days in the Wellington area in hopes of capturing the remainder of the party, but without success. “I have to add that they received 1/- a day each, in lieu of subsistence, from the 18 April to 15 May, enclosing an account which will duly be forwarded to the New South Wales Government,” wrote

Police Commissioner Finniss.
One wonders if the runaways were ever caught up with. For two members of the escape party the venture proved disastrous; Brown with a shattered hand and being taken back to where he came from; the soldier meeting a watery end in the Murray, and ending up in an unmarked grave in the wilderness. Surely, for these two at least, a case of jumping out of the frying pan into the fire.
Troopers Henry Graham and Peter Byers   eventually hit the overland trail for Portland and home, taking with them to return to their rightful owners “the bay horse with black points which was abandoned within 30 miles of Lake Albert,” together with the mare “with four white feet, star on forehead, long tail, 15 hands high and about three years old” which had been “borrowed” by the escapees as they fled to the bush.
 Another explanation comes from Lindsay Gordon Lang, of Naracoorte, who claimed that the grave was that of his great uncle Archi Vincent who died around 1854.










A stockman, Archi broke his neck when thrown from his horse while helping pioneer poet, Adam Lindsay Gordon transport a prisoner from Mount    Gambier to Adelaide. [At the time Gordon was a mounted trooper based at Mount Gambier. He left the police force a year later to concentrate on horse-breaking for a while. He committed suicide in 1870].
Lindsay claims his grandmother, Jane Kathleen Lang [nee Vincent] had received a letter from the poet detailing how Archi had died and where Gordon had  buried him. as a result”, Lindsay added. “I don’t know where the letter is now, but I can remember when I was about 6 years old, going out in a horse and buggy with my grandfather John Lang to try and find the grave.”








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Did you recognise him? 


Gibbert Chimney, Mick Torrone and  Cadet Paul Schramm  assisted Sgt. Bert Whitford, Det. Kevin John, SC/CAllen Cliff, in the capture of escapees Henderson, Wilson & Scott at Port Pirie in the late 1960’s.























Since the formation of the various Labour Societies and Councils at Port Adelaide some years ago there has been several disputes between the employers and the employed, but in every instance the employees have had to give way.  The continued success of the labour party has evidently had the effect of making them not so careful of the rights of others as they ought to have been.  This is borne out by the fact that their latest dispute was so glaringly wrong that   after a seven days lock out they have this time had to submit, and in doing so no doubt acted wisely and well.   As in all cases of dispute of a like nature a good deal of   misrepresentation has been used, but we believe the matter may be briefly summed up as follows:-



The Adelaide Steamship Company employed a large  number of men on their steamers which are engaged in the coasting and intercolonial trade.  All the men and officers employed are members of one or other of the unions  Some time since is was reported that the Captain and  Officers Society contemplated joining the Maritime Labour Council and it was thought that this action of theirs would interfere with the best interest of the company in whose employ man of the captains and officers were.  It was urged that a captain when away from home port was a representative of the owners and, that in case of dispute within his men could not act independently because he would be a member of the same council as the men themselves were.

This view of the case was so reasonable, that the public opinion, led by the press, have during the present strike been in favour of the company, in most likely has influenced kindred societies in the other colonies in expressing the disapprobation of the hasty action of the Port Adelaide Unions.

During the strike week there was a good deal of amusement, afforded by the union men’s endeavours to prevent non union men from working in the steamers.

Our artist has given a number of sketches from which a few ideas of what took place may be inferred.  A rollicking devil may care unionist caused no end of fun by liberating a fine rooster amongst a crowd of people who were confronted by a number of mounted troopers, the observations of the crowd, as the bird dodged amongst the troopers’ horses caused great  laughter. 

The successful attempt to prevent a cabload of men leaving the Konoowarra although most illegal was not thought seriously of as a consequence of the good humoured way in which it was conducted. 

The absdurdity of Station master Rowell keeping the crowd in check by pointing his pipe case in their fact and threatening to blow out here with the brains of the first man who approached was another instance of the fun which characterized the whole proceeding.  More serious     proceedings were reported, but for want of reliable witnesses it would difficult to say the reports were not exaggerated; many threats of “dipping”, boycotting, tarring etc. were uttered, but the police, aided by the good sense of the majority were able to prevent any of these being carried out.  It is to be regretted that the strike caused considerable present loss both to the men and the employers, but perhaps after the storm a wholesome calm may somewhat compensate for the loss on both sides.  













  After 4 months of non activity we have been inundated with requests for Museum Visits.  During March we carried out several outside visits including the 20th Anniversary of the Adelaide Gaol’s Preservation Society on Sunday 9th March. Even though it was an extremely hot day, and the visitor numbers were down  our super salesmen managed to add a  considerable amount to the Society’s coffers.  Once again raising the profile of both the Society & SAPOL.
                   

  






Wednesday 19th March, President Geoff Rawson spoke to a very appreciative audience of some 50 members of the Walkerville Historical Society.   

Monday 17th December saw the Chrysler Royal on vacation for 4 days at  Mitsubishi for their closing ceremonies.

Saturday 29th March members attended the Mt. Barker Agricultural Show with the commodore Highway Patrol Car & Trailer & 2 BSA Solo Motorcycles.  Sales of memorabilia netted a profit of almost $105.00
27 of our dedicated Volunteers (including 2 new members) were right back into the fray on Sunday 30th March with a group of 75 adults & children from the CSIRO Double Helix Science Club visiting the barracks for a tour with barbecue lunch.  Our sincere thanks  to all those  who helped to make this such a special day for all concerned— boosting the Society’s funds by approximately $500.






   

   


          










  





UPCOMING EVENTS FOR APRIL & MAY.
(INTERNAL EVENTS REQUIRING VOLUNTEERS
ARE HIGHLIGHTED).




SUNDAY 13TH APRIL—POLICE ANZAC MEMORIAL SERVICE (SEE PAGE 5).

WEDNESDAY 23RD APRIL—UP TO 50 MEMBERS OF THE GAWLER VETERAN VINTAGE CAR CLUB TO TOUR THE MUSEUM 10.00 AM —12.30 PM.

MONDAY 28TH APRIL—POLICE FOUNDATION DAY 170TH ANNIVERSARY —LAUNCH OF “IN THE LINE OF DUTY “ EXHIBITION AT S.A MUSEUM.

TUESDAY 29TH APRIL— SPECIAL INVITATION DAY. V.I.P’S TO VISIT MUSEUM AS A FOLLOW UP TO FOUNDATION DAY DISPLAY OF VINTAGE & CURRENT VEHICLES ON THE PARADE GROUND.

FRIDAY 2ND—SUNDAY 4TH MAY  - POLICE TATTOO.

FRIDAY 2ND MAY—8.00 PM SAPHS MONTHLY MEETING.

TUESDAY 13TH MAY  - OUTSIDE VISIT TO KALYRA AGED CARE FACILITY.
 
TUESDAY 13TH MAY  -  WHYALLA LAW STUDENTS TO VISIT MUSEUM.

WEDNESDAY 14TH MAY—10.00 AM OVER 50’S GROUP OF 25-30 TO VISIT THE MUSEUM.

THURSDAY 15TH MAY—OUTSIDE VISIT TO WOODHOUSE SOCIAL & SERVICE GROUP, STIRLING.

SUNDAY 18TH MAY— HISTORY WEEK MUSEUM TOURS, VEHICLE SHED.
 
SUNDAY 18TH MAY— OUTSIDE TALK TO OLD TROOPERS AT POLICE CLUB.
 
TUESDAY 20TH MAY— VEHICLE DISPLAY AT AIMEE STADIUM FOR TRAFFIC SUPPORT BRANCH.
 
THURSDAY 22ND MAY—2.00 PM 20 PEOPLE FROM PT. ELLIOT NATIONAL TRUST TO VISIT MUSEUM.


THE RESPONSE TO LAST MONTH’S REQUEST FOR VOLUNTEERS WAS ABSOLUTELY FANTASTIC.  IF YOU CAN HELP WITH ANY OF THESE INSIDE VISITS PLEASE EITHER RING US OR SEND AN EMAIL. ANY ASSISTANCE WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.



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The “HUE & CRY” is  Published by the
South Australian
  Police Historical Society Inc.,
Thebarton Police Barracks
C/- G.P.O. Box 1539 
Adelaide 5001
S.A. 5083

.




Editor
Editor Elees Pick                          

Elees Pick

Web site
Society
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www.sapolicehistory.org/

webmaster@
sapolicehistory.org



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