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THEBARTON BARRACKS - STABLES
(from the searcy collection)


See 'Blast from the Past'




   President
  We mourn the sad loss of one of our esteemed members Peter Mason who sadly passed away on 8th July.  Peter had a wonderful knowledge of the police radio network particularly the history.  He was a font of knowledge and always willing to help.  Sadly this knowledge will be lost to us. Our condolences to his family for his untimely passing.

Peter Malpas is recovering after a short stint in hospital. Rod Stokes has also been for a visit to hospital however both were back at Thebarton the following Thursday.

We are fortunate in receiving a donation of wonderfully framed photographs related to police history from Sgt Joe Gallina (driver training).  These will be a wonderful asset to the Dorothy Pyatt gallery once they have been cataloged and entered into the data-base.

Dave Rostan is to be congratulated on his outstanding work on the Chrysler Royal  with brakes, ignition & door locks now in good working condition.

On Friday the 7th July Robin McKnight addressed our monthly meeting.  Robin spoke about the interesting history of many residents of the North Road Cemetery.  His memory is outstanding as he spoke about people who had a major impact on the development of the colony, including Alexander Tolmer, our first premier Finnes  etc.  His talk was warmly received by the 50 members present who had plenty of questions for Robin.  Bob Boesence provided a vote of thanks & presented him with a certificate of appreciation and a book.






                  

Colin  Beams conducted the raffle which raised $76.00.

Our next meeting on the 4th August will feature Retired Superintendent Neville Collins and his subject will be based on his book Jetties of South Australia.  Hope to see you all there.



   Geoff Rawson

  President








These series of articles has been compiled with assistance from Bill Bird, The Advertiser, The News, The Glenelg Guardian and  the South Australian Police Historical Society archives.
Photograph of Mayor William Fisk courtesy of the City of Holdfast bay Historical Centre.




The sale of the James Wardle, for  ₤202.00, in 1946 helped with funds to commission the building of a new lifeboat, to serve as an auxiliary craft to the new 40ft police patrol boat  ‘Archie Badenoch’; to be used in case of emergency when the larger craft was away on patrol or rescue work.

Carvel built & constructed by Searle Boat Builders of Birkenhead, the dimensions are listed as follows:

 

Length            4.8 metre

Beam                1.8 metre

Draft               385 mm

Engine              Simplex two stroke – later replaced with Ford Marine (four cylinders)

Range              7 hours

Moored            Originally on davits on the Glenelg & later in the Patawalonga Boat Haven.


On  Wednesday the 1st October 1947  the “William Fisk” was christened  by Mrs. Fisk, in memory of her late husband -  former colorful  Glenelg Mayor 7 well known parliamentarian - William Fisk.

In what he described, to an audience sheltering from wind & sleet, as “typical lifeboat weather”, the then Mayor of Glenelg (Mr. W. Allen) handed over the new 16ft  auxiliary lifeboat  “William Fisk” to the Commissioner of Police (Mr. W.F. Johns) at a ceremony at the Pioneers Memorial, Moseley Square, Glenelg.  In a few words, Mrs. Fisk tendered her thanks to everyone for naming the boat after her late husband, who had always been fond of the sea.  “If it is as true to its duty as my husband was to his, it will have fulfilled its destiny” she said.

The plaque, originally placed in the James Wardle, commemorating the efforts of singer Gladys Moncreiff in raising funds for the purchase of that boat, had been transferred to the new craft.   The plaque inscribed “In memory of services rendered by Gladys Moncreiff who instituted the Glenelg Life Boat Appeal 12 Nov 1932”.

Commissioner Johns said that since the Archie Badenoch had been located at Glenelg he felt that it was somewhat at a disadvantage because, as it was required at various points along the coastline at different times, it might be absent when needed locally.  If the occasion did arise when its services were called upon from two points at once an awkward situation could eventuate.

“I can assure you the two boats will be in good hands”, he went on. “Two of the water “I can assure you the two boats will be in good hands”, he went on. “Two of the water constables engaged have had 5 ½ years service with the Navy & the third also saw service with the Navy.  They are thus all fully experienced”.

The William Fisk had an outstanding career as a Police Boat & lifeboat & for twenty four years went to sea in any weather for rescue missions. It was skippered by Water Police Constables Keogh, Laslett &  Bill Bird; the latter had charge of it for eighteen of those years.  The William Fisk was withdrawn from service at Glenelg in 1971, when a new high speed fibre glass trailer boat was commissioned to replace it.

In what he described, to an audience sheltering from wind & sleet, as “typical lifeboat weather”, the then Mayor of
Glenelg (Mr. W. Allen) handed over the new 16ft  auxiliary lifeboat  “William Fisk” to the Commissioner of Police (Mr. W.F. Johns) at a ceremony at the Pioneers Memorial, Moseley Square, Glenelg.  In a few words, Mrs. Fisk tendered her thanks to everyone for naming the boat after her late husband, who had always been fond of the sea.  “If it is as true to its duty as my husband was to his, it will have fulfilled its destiny” she said.

The plaque, originally placed in the James Wardle, commemorating the efforts of singer Gladys Moncreiff in raising funds for the purchase of that boat, had been transferred to the new craft.   The plaque inscribed “In memory of services rendered by Gladys Moncreiff who instituted the Glenelg Life Boat Appeal 12 Nov 1932”.

 Commissioner Johns said that since the Archie Badenoch had been located at Glenelg he felt that it was somewhat at a disadvantage because, as it was required at various points along the coastline at different times, it might be absent when needed locally.  If the occasion did arise when its services were called upon from two points at once an awkward situation could eventuate.

“I can assure you the two boats will be in good hands”, he went on. “Two of the water constables engaged have had 5 ½ years service with the Navy & the third also saw service with the Navy.  They are thus all fully experienced”.







Laslett
Keogh
Bird


 The William Fisk had an outstanding career as a Police Boat & lifeboat & for twenty four years went to sea in any weather for rescue missions. It was skippered by Water Police Constables Keogh, Laslett &  Bill Bird; the latter had charge of it for eighteen of those years.


The William Fisk was the only rescue boat on call between Henley Beach & Seacliff.  During the winter months William Fisk was moored at the Patawalonga Boat Moor & had everchanging entrance due to moving sand bars, in summer she was moored out at sea slightly north of the present day Jetty.  On occasion, when there were heavy seas, Constable Bill Bird swam out to tow her back to shore using a buoy & a length of rope.  In normal conditions,  a dingy, which was kept in the mortuary at the back of the old Glenelg Police Station, was used to row out to the rescue boat.

 The William Fisk was withdrawn from service at Glenelg in 1971, when a new high speed fibre glass trailer boat was commissioned to replace it.

 For several years after that it was moored at the Port Adelaide Water Police Station & used occasionally for searches in the shallow water behind Torrens Island.  It was also used as a training launch for Cadet instruction in handling small craft.  The craft changed hands several times & eventually became unseaworthy due to neglect.

Next month: Restoration commences.














This article is re-printed with kind permission of the USA Law
and Order magazine and was written by Shelia Burnette who
 is a police officer in the Chicagoland area.


Police museums can be found both where they’re expected, like Los Angeles, London, Paris and New York, and in unusual places like a monastery in Prague and the back roads of Arkansas. The following are a few examples of the museums open to the public and are meant to give a sampling of what’s available.
www.policeguide.com


Drug Enforcement Adminstration
www.usdoj.gov.dea/museum

The DEA’s Museum is a bit unusual since it is open to the public with regular hours, but admission is by appointment only. Located in Arlington, VA, the museum is operated by the DEA’s Office of Public Affairs.
Inside the museum, a variety of exhibits are featured outlining the DEA’s mission, history and some of its more notable feats in enforcing U.S. narcotic laws.
One featured exhibit is “Illegal Drugs in America; A modern History.”  This exhibit traces drug use in America from the opium dens of the 1800’s to the international crime organisations that run “narcobusiness” today. the exhibit traces the impact drugs have had on American society and the counternarcotics efforts used to combat the problem. It also traces DEA’s evolution from part of the Treasury Department to the force it is today.

NYPD
www.nycpolicemuseum.org

The largest law enforcement department in the United States not only has a huge museum,  but the museum itself has a gift shop and its own quarterly newsletter. The museum traces the department's history back to 1609, when famed English navigator Henry Hudson
brought a Dutch ship ashore on the southern end of the island the local tribes called Manhattan (place of many springs and rivers). The Dutch West India Company founded the colony of New Amsterdam in 1625, when the island's first peacekeeper, a Schout-fiscal (sheriff/attorney), was appointed.
The Museum lists a variety of "firsts" from the department, including: the first police matrons and the employment of' the first African-American officers being hired in 1891; establishment of the Bicycle Squad in 1895; the department's first camera for mug shots, first used on Feb. 23, 1897 on pickpocket James Sullivan, whose photos are also on display; the creation of the Bomb Squad; the adoption of fingerprinting in 1903; the first mobile radio motor patrols in 1932; and the first NYPD helicopter used by the Aviation Unit in 1947. In more recent history, the museum documents the adoption of the 911 system in 1968; the replacement of the title policeman with police officer in 1973 and the merging of the city's Transit Police and Housing Authority Police with NYPD in 1995.
Other notable exhibits include early communications equipment, firearms, uniforms, vehicles, patches, training, identification and courtroom art. The museum also offers golf outings, museum memberships, youth academies and ongoing education programs as part of its repertoire, as well as its gift shop. Two years ago, the museum moved from the department's Police Academy grounds to Bowling Green in lower Man¬hattan.





U.S. Marshal's Service
www.ywoprisonpark.org

It is perhaps fitting the museum housing the history of the first 200 years of' the U.S. Marshals Service should be located in Wyoming. When the phrase "U.S. Marshal" is said, many think of lawmen from the Old West.
Many people saw the Marshal's traveling exhibit, "America's Star: U.S. Marshals, I789-1989;" when it toured the country for more than two years in, the late 1980s to commemorate the service's bicentennial. When the tour closed in 1991, the Wyoming Territorial Park in Laramie was chosen to house the exhibit, now officially called the National U.S. Marshal's Museum.
The museum showcases the 200 year history of the Marshals. One of the more popular displays is "The Gunmen: Romance and Reality;"  which contrasts Hollywood's version of the Old West with reality through clips from Western movies: Other displays include a Mar¬shal's badge collection, arrest warrants of famous outlaws and, added in 1996, the story of "The Falcon and the Snowman," one the country's most notorious espionage cases. Also added recently is a computerized U.S. Marshal's Service History Records Center, where visitors can access historical data on former marshals and deputy marshals. 
Next Month:  The last Precinct, San Diego & Scotland Yard.






Memoirs of the late Sergeant (Retired) Bob Clark
(Continued)

   

As a number at Port Adelaide were becoming less necessary, members commenced being transferred.  Many of the foot branch being sent for duty in Adelaide & mounted men being sent to Barracks.

I left Port Adelaide in 1931 & then became attached to the mounted branch at the Thebarton Barracks.



After a period of 3 years at Port Adelaide, living in what would be almost slum conditions by today's standards, it was a real luxury to move into the much better facilities at Barracks.   For the first time in my term as a Police officer I became accustomed to a different style of living.



Firstly we were billeted in a two story stone building with cubicles partitioned to hold 2 men with a door leading into a passageway.  Showers & toilets were included in the same building.  The hours of duty were the same as those which had applied at Port Adelaide & there was no relaxation as to time off & we were still required to be in the Barracks at midnight signing out and in, in a book kept for that purpose in the orderly room. The mess room was in another stone building on the ground floor with lecture room, reading room, & billiard saloon on the top floor.




The stables which were in a similar complex were also of stone & had brick floors & partitioned horse stalls with feeding troughs along the centre enabling horses to be fed from a bin which was run through the stables on a tram line.  Horses had to be attended to morning & afternoon & a guard was kept on the stables overnight.




The facilities for sport were also much better than at Port Adelaide as the whole of the exercise yard was of asphalt & tennis nets could be erected when the Parade Ground was not being used. During the summer months we played tennis matches on Sundays & were permitted to invite lady partners to make up mixed teams.


Horses were exercised on the Parade Ground & in the small paddock at the rear of the stables but when we engaged in jumping and tent pegging we used a paddock owned by the railways which was adjacent to the Barracks.

I became a supervisor in the Billiard Room & did all the tipping of cues as required & kept the table cleaned & ironed.

We commenced mounted patrols & twice weekly 2 constables were detailed to attend at the East End Markets to keep streets clear of vehicles  -  A job which commenced at 5.00 a.m. & lasted until about 9.00 a.m.

Mounted constables were also rostered to perform mounted duty at football matches on Saturdays & attended at Race meetings. We were also on duty when processions& other functions were held which attracted crowds in the streets.




At Easter time each year a number of us were sent to Oakbank to perform duty at the annual race meeting.  Horses were ridden up there on Good Friday & stabled at Balhannah & after performing duty at the races on the Saturday & the Monday we rode back on Tuesday.  During our stay up there we were billeted at the Balhannah Hotel & it was certainly a great way to view the running of the Steeplechase Event from a horse & the trip was looked forward to each year by members who were interested in horse racing.

After a period in Barracks several of us commenced to play football for the Police Team in the Wednesday afternoon association.  Playing against teams from the Tramways, PMG, market gardeners and fire brigade teams with matches being played on Unley and Norwood ovals.  The football in these games was of a pretty high standard as our team contained quite a few league players and all other teams had a few players of the same standard.  The Police team was very successful in this competition and during my time there we won two Premierships.




We were given permission to compete at various sports meetings in equestrian events and our team more than held their own in tent pegging and jumping events.





We also competed successfully at the Royal Adelaide Show in these events and in my time I was successful one year in being awarded the first prize for the best turned out trooper which was always a very prestigious trophy event, but a bit of luck had to be your way in the allocation of a horse.
To be continued.........



PULL OVER DRIVER!!

THIS ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPH comes from member Phil Howard.

                          


Approx 1990 -  Woomera threshold to airport main runway.  Senior Constables Terry Pledge & Phil Howard on Patrol in the area had occasion to stop & talk with the pilot of the pictured F 1 – 11 in regard to excess speed & undue noise over Woomera township.  In reality the Royal Australian Air Force photographer, known as Flash Gordon, wanted a photograph to out stage all other sections of the Air Force Magazine.










   Friday 4th August at 8.00 pm

SPEAKER : Supt. (ret.) Neville Collins
SUBJECT:  The History of South Australian Jetties




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The following Members attended a morning parade at the police academy on the 31st may to receive their sapol service medal with 30 year clasp.

              
                  
Ret. Snr. Sgt. Kevin Beare OAM
Ret. Snr. Sgt. Rex Greig
Ret. Snr. Sgt. Bob Ward 
Ret. Snr. Sgt. Tony Woodcock PEM



              Former Principal of Women Police,  Sgt. 2nd Grade
             Joyce Richardson was presented with a her clasp,  by Deputy
Commissioner John White, at a private Ceremony on 26th May.





Snr. Const. Pauline Elshaw also received a clasp to her National Medal.




Rex Greig, Tony Woodcock, Bill Rojas, Kevin Beare, &
Bob Ward at Medal Presentation Ceremony.



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VALE 
Peter William Mason 
Peter Mason 

Passed away 8th July 2006       
  Esteemed  member of the Historical  Society



REST IN PEACE.















     







Helen & Bob Ward do a spot of general
Museum cleaning.






Betty Hyson celebrates her 80th





Rodney Stokes has spent many months working on a very dilapidated fire truck : note his very fashionable multi- coloured overalls.  Many will remember using the fire truck during training & its complete restoration,  to better than new,  is testament to his skill & patience.  Thanks Rod. 




Now where did I put that?
Dave Rostan





Is this what you were looking for?
Alan Hyson with Ernie McLeod and Bob Ward.



Kevin Beare & Holger Kruse show students from St. John’s College, Whyalla around the Museum



Front Grille  & Bumper Bars urgently  needed  to complete FJ  restoration.Can you help?































June has been a very busy month for volunteers Geoff Rawson,  Kevin Beare & Elees Pick with Museum & outside visits, including the Burnside Knitting Ladies, Edwardstown Men’s Probus Club, Lutheran School Librarians, & Norwood Probus (where 72 ladies learnt more about the Society & Drug Squad operations from Kevin). As you can see by the above photographs all participants were most impressed  - with one gentleman really ‘getting down to it’!!


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The “HUE & CRY” is  Published by the
South Australian
  Police Historical Society Inc.,
Thebarton Police Barracks
C/- G.P.O. Box 1539 
Adelaide 5001
S.A. 5083

.




Editor
Editor

Elees Pick

Web site
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www.sapolicehistory.org/


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