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2007 Glenelg Christmas Pageant.





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   President
On  Friday  the 30th  December  about  110 members and  visitors attended a the Police Club for  our 30th Anniversary/Christmas Dinner including The  Commissioner Mal Hyde and his wife Marcia, and  the Deputy  Garry Burns and his wife Denise and we all enjoyed a wonderful evening. 


Three members of the inaugural committee  -  Dorothy Pyatt, Rob Clyne and Max Slee were  present and together cut the cake.



The two dads from the Police Band provided light music during the evening and they are to be commended for the entertainment they provided.
















New Life Member lapel pins were presented to Dorothy Pyatt, Rob Clyne and Jim Sykes by the Commissioner Mal Hyde who then spoke about each of the Life members and the Thursday group of volunteers.  The other life members not present will be presented their lapel pins at a later date.

                                  

The raffle was conducted with the assistance of the Deputy Commissioner Gary Burns with a large number of prizes distributed raising in  excess of $300.00.  This was followed by special entertainment by the “Catch Girls”, a trio of singers who harmonized and sang a number of popular songs.

Those who have visited the Thebarton Barracks will have noted the work being done to renovate the exterior of the Museum (Troopers quarters) and our Administration and Meeting room (the Mess).  Scaffolding has been erected through out the area making access to the whole of Barracks very limited. At this stage, we understand that the work will be ongoing until March 2008, but we will keep you posted.

                           


                               

 

   Geoff Rawson

  President


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Australia's first Chief Constable

by Steve Price

Concluding  the article from the February 2007 Edition of “Police Down Under” brought to our attention by member  Bill Rojas. 


Kable proved to be rather effective at his work and managed the Police Gaol well. Importantly, his powerful size and strength meant that when called upon to arrest drunken citizens he was inevitable successful. Physically he was suited to the role and particularly glad of the privileges it offered. However there were constant complaints, particularly from the marines and their wives regarding the inefficiency of the constables,. Whom they could not tolerate due to them being convicts and emancipists.

Kables work included searching the holds of ships. Counting supplies and checking boats to ensure that oars and sails had been removed overnight to deter convict escapees.  However it was difficult to keep law and order in the town with its itinerant population of convicts, assignees and seamen.

And there was the constant issue of dealing with the marine corpsmen who paid no heed to his authority whilst engaging in as much drunkenness and lawlessness as the convicts.

There was a constant need for the gaol with a steady stream of inhabitants made more so by the entrepreneurial Chief Constable opening the      licensed alehouse Ramping Horse not far from the gaol.  Kable had entered into an agreement with Captains Thomas Rowley and John Macarthur, paymasters of the 102nd Regiment, New South Wales Corps.  They permitted Kable to buy supplies from their monopoly of rum and spirits at the not unreasonable mark up of five hundred percent.  This still allowed Kable a profit margin.  In that period taverns were generally part of, or attached to, the owners house.  Its location, ‘a public house  adjacent to the prison’ is identified by the Irish convict Joseph Holt in his memoirs published after his return to Ireland in 1814.  He wrote “...my friend Mr. Smyth .. and I went to the jailer’s and he was Chief Constable but kept a publick house        joining the prison, and Mr. Smyth called for a bottle or rum, and we drank it, and he left orders for Henry Kable to let me come over and take         refreshment whenever I liked…”  This early NSW alehouse displayed a signboard of a snorting black horse with the inscription—Licensee: Henry Kable.  Its location enabled Kable to not only conduct his business close to home but to also evict, arrest and gaol troublesome customers of the Ramping Horse.

(The original home of Kable and his family in George Street North with its adjacent gaol was demolished in 1926.  It is now the site of the Regent Hotel whose restaurant is aptly named ‘Kable’s’.)

There were from time to time more serious arrests and these were dealt with by the military tribunal or court.  One such occasion saw a convict overseer by the name of Isaac Nicol; (who later opened the first post office in the colony around 1810) receive an additional 14 years sentence for receiving stolen goods.  However he had little time for hounding petty thieves and would be escapees as he found them more stupid than criminal.




The Ramping Horse kept Kable busy and was generally prosperous even though Kable was often made to pay the Corps Officers as much as ₤2 a  gallon for rum. By this time Susannah Kable had

borne three more children and Henry Kable was looking for more opportunities to boost his income.
With another ex convict James Underwood, Kable bought, built or chartered many vessels and pioneered the sealing industry in Bass Strait.    Underwood building the ships while Kable taking the role of ships husband, provisioned the  voyages,  employed the crews etc.  Simeon Lord joined this enterprise some years later when Kable and  Underwood wanted to sell the skins to London for the hat trade.

They were able to use Lord’s London agent, Plummer,. When Lord joined the partnership.  At one point they were amongst the wealthiest men in the Colony with Lord being extremely wealthy in his own right due to other business ventures.  This was fortuitous as Governor King saw fit to dismiss Kable from his position of Chief Constable for breaches or port regulations and illegally buying and importing pigs from a visiting ship.

The three partners at one period offended Governor Bligh when they sent him an abusive  letter complained about port regulations.  Bligh fined each of them one hundred pounds and put them into the town gaol for a month.  After Bligh was deposed, the three took revenge by backing the rebels of the Rum Corps and offering help in defraying the costs of George Johnston  going to London to put the rebels case to the Home  Government although there is doubt as to whether they actually paid up.

Kable continued on with his innovative businesses, opening the first Sydney-Parramatta coach, establishing land, buildings, a store and brewery in Windsor.  Whilst he had several land holdings they were mostly not held at the same time.  He sold his house and storehouses in Sydney when he moved to Pitt Town in 18ll (the Hawkesbury area) and probably used this money to buy the Windsor store and brewery.  He bought a number of other small holdings.  

By the 1820’s Kable was a prosperous grandfather and along with several others of the district a   committeeman of the Windsor Bible Society.  His wife Susannah died in 1825 and Henry lived until 1846 reaching the age of 84.  Together he and his wife Susannah had 11 children and today there are thousands of descendants of the first Chief Constable of Australia (including several who have been or are serving members of the New South Wales Police)
borne three more children and Henry Kable was looking for more opportunities to boost his income.
With another ex convict James Underwood, Kable bought, built or chartered many vessels and pioneered the sealing industry in Bass Strait.    Underwood building the ships while Kable taking the role of ships husband, provisioned the voyages,  employed the crews etc.  Simeon Lord joined this enterprise some years later when Kable and  Underwood wanted to sell the skins to London for the hat trade.

They were able to use Lord’s London agent, Plummer,. When Lord joined the partnership.  At one point they were amongst the wealthiest men in the Colony with Lord being extremely wealthy in his own right due to other business ventures.  This was fortuitous as Governor King saw fit to dismiss Kable from his position of Chief Constable for breaches or port regulations and illegally buying and importing pigs from a visiting ship.

The three partners at one period offended Governor Bligh when they sent him an abusive letter complained about port regulations.  Bligh fined each of them one hundred pounds and put them into the town gaol for a month.  After Bligh was deposed, the three took revenge by backing the rebels of the Rum Corps and offering help in defraying the costs of George Johnston  going to London to put the rebels case to the Home  Government although there is doubt as to whether they actually paid up.

Kable continued on with his innovative businesses, opening the first Sydney-Parramatta coach, establishing land, buildings, a store and brewery in Windsor.  Whilst he had several land holdings they were mostly not held at the same time.  He sold his house and storehouses in Sydney when he moved to Pitt Town in 18ll (the Hawkesbury area) and probably used this money to buy the Windsor store and brewery.  He bought a number of other small holdings.  

By the 1820’s Kable was a prosperous grandfather and along with several others of the district a committeeman of the Windsor Bible Society.  His wife Susannah died in 1825 and Henry lived until 1846 reaching the age of 84.  Together he and his wife Susannah had 11 children and today there are thousands of descendants of the first Chief Constable of Australia (including several who have been or are serving members of the New South Wales Police) 




Footnote:
The author is indebted to descendants Alan Wild and June Whittaker for the provision of articles, materials and documents relating to Henry and Susannah Kable.     
Whittaker, June, 2002. Kable.  The story of Henry Kable.  First Fleet Convict Extraordinaire, Sydney  www.hawkesburyhistory,org, au/articles/phillip.html.


The South Australian Police Historical Society gratefully acknowledges the article’s writer, *Steve Pierce, & the National Editor of International Police Association’s magazine in Australia, Graham Hunt, for their kind permission in allowing this   article to be reproduced in the Hue & Cry from it’s original source—The March edition of “Police Down Under”.

*For information:  Superintendent Stephen Pierce has a 29 year police career with Victoria Police & significant operational experience in uniform & the State Crime Squads, particularly in the Asian & organized crime areas.  He is a visiting Police   Fellow at the Australian Institute of Police Management & holder of a number of significant academic qualifications, including

Masters Degrees in both Business Administration, & Leadership & Management (Policing)  In his current role he is responsible for delivery of Leadership Programs at post graduate level for senior police in Australasia & the Pacific region. 









     

Concluding our series on  letters written  by 
   William Charles Miller to  Eleanor May Ewens.



Pine Creek February 3rd 1912.


Would like you Dear Girl to come as soon as you can so come with the first lady who is returning. Mrs. Ellen Ryan, widow, Licensee of the Hotel Victoria Darwin, living in Wayville in a house called Shackle and Mrs. H. E. Schunke, storekeeper’s wife of Pine Creek. I spoke to her husband last night and he is writing to her about you this mail. Both ladies know me and I am certain will be only too glad to be of assistance to us. The Montoro is a new boat and is running with the Burns Philip Line with the Mataran also a new vessel. By this line they give passengers a saloon ticket from Adelaide to Sydney per railway and saloon passage to Darwin for £18 and by the E. & A. Line passengers must pay their own fare to Melbourne and then they must have to wait on the boat in Sydney for 5 or 7 days so that it would be better to travel on the Burns Philip Line, but if there is anyone coming up in the E & A Line, pay the difference i.e. £6 railway fair from Adelaide to Sydney and travel with company. I don’t want you to do the journey alone. Inspector Waters said that he would make things as comfortable as he could for me and I believe he will carry out his promise. Warden Playford returned by Eastern last Monday and I met and had a pitch with him.

Pine Creek N.T.

I hear the S.S. Aldenham is leaving Darwin on Monday. Last Sunday eve we had some music at Mr. Schunke’s. Mr. Playford came down on Tuesday evening and as I just had a report of a man dying suddenly I reported it to him [being a J.P.]. He was good enough to drive me out in the Warden’s buggy 22 miles. We were away all night and had a good old yarn. I buried the corpse and brought 17 horses and plant back with me. I have been fixing up my reports etc.
I am anxiously waiting for a mail from South to hear from you. It seems so long since the last. I told Playford that you were coming up and he is a very straight old chap. I have got rid of Maudie [housekeeper]. She wanted a spell so I let her go and I have a very good cook now called Minnie. She makes splendid bread but is a very particular lady for a nigger, smokes only the dearest tobacco, must have butter and taking her all round so far she is well worth all her little whims.

Pine Creek. April 12th, 1912.

Am informed that the Empire is a week late leaving Darwin so I think that you will get this just before you leave Yorketown. I got your wire last night to say Empire leaving Sydney on May 8th. It will probably be the 15th before she leaves. How time drags on. Dear Girl, bring a washing copper and wringer without stands. Will have both stands made here. We cannot buy a copper here unless it is ordered from South and that means middleman’s profit. Everything is very dear here.
Mr. Schunke informed me that he is going to instruct and E. & A. Agent man Brown to arrange his wife’s passage then he will pay at this end so I think you had better do the same and then you will have the ready cash in case you want it. If you have already paid and booked your passage when you receive this let me know by wire. I hope that you have not forgotten a good collection of music, the dear old songs in low settings because I cannot sing and they must be fairly easy.
The Parliamentary Picnic will be here soon and the new Ad., Gilruth. I expect that I will have to run out mounted in full regalia. Am getting a little bit of barrack about the event that is about to take place. I believe some of them are more excited than I. Remember me to all the dear ones at home. Am writing to Mother tonight. My last letter as the only bachelor son.

Married in Darwin early on the morning of 24th May, 1912. Took an early morning train to Pine Creek on the same day.






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ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Friday
1st  FEBRUARY, 2008


Election of Officers
& Committee

Nomination Forms available on request.
Nominations must be received prior to 25th January, 2008




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CriminalHumour

by Allan Peters



Two undercover policewomen running a prostitution sting in Dothan, in October declined to arrest a pickup-truck-driving john, around age 70, despite his three attempts to procure their services. He first offered to give the women the three squirrels he had just shot, but they ignored him (too much trouble to store the evidence). A few minutes later, he added to the offer the used refrigerator in his truck, but the officers again declined (same reason). On the third trip, he finally offered cash: $6, but without the squirrels and refrigerator. The officers again declined but said they resolved to arrest him if he returned, but he did not.

PHILADELPHIA - Officer Margo Grady was on her way to deliver a rape victim from a downtown hospital to a police station a few miles away when her car disappeared into the Philadelphia night. After a couple of hours city police began a search for the missing officer, even enlisting the help of a police helicopter, but to no avail. It wasn't until seventy miles later that Officer Grady flagged down a trooper in New Jersey to ask for directions.


Those Lishui County police are clever. In order to generate a little extra cash deputy chief Gao Mingliang and his subordinates set up a brothel disguised as a restaurant in May of last year. When the girls lured customers into the back room the police would bust in and drag the unhappy John to the station where he would be "fined." The girls would even get performance bonuses depending on how well they did. The scam fell apart  when the brothel owner was arrested by an officer from a neighboring department, but not before deputy chief Gao Mingliang and his boys racked up over 80,000 yuan.


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FROM THE ARCHIVES.

First time Aqualung Squad operated.

GLEN OSMOND
SHOOTING.







Above – The entrance gate to (left) City Bricks Ltd.,
Glen Osmond Road, in front of which two men were
shot   yesterday.
Right
Members of the Police Underwater Recovery Squad
who searched the bed of the Torrens where the rifle
used in the shooting is alleged to have been thrown
(from Left)  Mounted Constables R.E. McCallum.
B.R. Bald and V. Godlimann.


Original Aqualung Squad 1957.

    1. Brian Bald.
    2. Colin Wilson.
    3. "Pedro" Warman.
    4. Vince Godlimann.
    5. Max Arthur.
    6. Ron McCallum.



Underwater recovery
celebrates 50th Anniversary









Christmas Anniversay Celebrations
       



    

   

     

     

     

   

     

   

   

   

     

     

 









     
                    With Christmas fast approaching we have been very busy with local Christmas Pageants.  During November our volunteers participated in the celebrations at Tea Tree Gully, Christies Beach, Port Adelaide, South Brighton, Norwood & Glenelg.  Our sincere thanks to Kevin Beare, Bill Bird, Bob Boscence, Mark Dollman, Dennis Irrgang, Kevin Johnson, Holger & Ros. Kruse, Elees Pick & Geoff Rawson, assisted by the BSA bikes, Suzuki outfit, VN Commodore, Chrysler Royal, & Police Boat William Fisk.   As you will see from the photos, our efforts were greatly appreciated both by the organisers & spectators, and the volunteers obviously enjoyed every minute!


      


   


                                   


                                    


                  




                  




        


                                    



                         


    

              




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The “HUE & CRY” is  Published by the
South Australian
  Police Historical Society Inc.,
Thebarton Police Barracks
C/- G.P.O. Box 1539 
Adelaide 5001
S.A. 5083

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Editor
Editor

Elees Pick

Web site

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www.sapolicehistory.org/


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